June 2018 messages


From Middlesex President, Kerrie Jenken

Happy Spring/ almost Summer from Middlesex!  It was an exercise in patience when it came to planting crops this spring but we made it through and things are really looking good now.  Despite the delayed start we were still able to get many of the 2018 Crop Projects implemented, stay tuned for all those project results at our upcoming meetings.  Speaking of which mark your calendars for our Summer Tour!  We’ve moved south of London this year on August 21st. We’ve got a great line up planned,  make sure you don’t miss it.

From Elgin President, Adam Pfeffer

Greetings from Elgin County!  After a slow start to the planting season we have enjoyed a nice 2 week stretch of weather and most people should be wrapping up planting very shortly.  Wheat is looking fantastic in the area and timing for fusarium control is approaching very fast.  We are working on a compaction session to be held in place of our summer tour in August so keep an eye out for more details on that!
Wishing everyone a safe planting season and fingers crossed mother nature doesn’t forget to rain this summer!

From Regional President, Scott Innes
Welcome to the June edition of the Thames Valley News.  The spring of 2018 is just another reminder that mother nature has the ultimate control over even the best laid plans.  Crops have seen rapid growth with the heat the last week of May.  I thank everyone that has taken the  time to set up trials this season.
I encourage everyone to get out to the county information meetings, tour / field days.  Your county directors have been working hard planning these events

 

From Regional Director, Phil Oegema
Things have gotten off to a good start in the Thames Valley area, most of the crop is out of ground and from the window of the pick-up truck, crop stands look to be excellent!  Looking back a few months however, we had some very significant rainfall events in the late parts of the winter that resulted in a lot of land being eroded.  Gully’s formed in the low spots, and we lost a lot of precious top soil.  Now that the crop is in, it is a good time to look seriously at what is available through the Canadian Agricultural Partnership program to help mitigate the effects of such weather events.  There are significant dollars available to help modify equipment, build erosion control structures, plant cover crops, and even retire fragile land.
I would urge everyone to consider how these things might improve your operation, and take advantage of these opportunities.  I wish everyone a safe and successful season.

 

Ottawa Rideau SCIA

Serving Lanark, Leeds, Grenville, Frontenac, Renfrew & Ottawa-Carleton

Golden Horseshoe Soil & Crop Improvement Association

The volunteer organization representing the Ontario Soil & Crop Improvement Association (OSCIA) members in the counties/regions of Brant, Haldimand, Halton, Niagara North, Niagara South, Norfolk, Peel and Wentworth.

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